How to Widen the Gap

In my novel “Carrots and Jaffas” a whitefella doctor working in an outback Aboriginal community has a recurring daydream. The doctor’s dreaming is of a pathway into a healthier unobese, normotensive, undiabetic, heartwell community. That pathway is the path of a sugarless past, a path followed by gatherers and hunters, who are not fast and fizzy food consumers.

That dreaming, a sort of longing for escape from the simple carbs that destroy his flock, that widen the Gap, is born from the reality the Doc sees at the checkout in the community’s foodshop. The local people stock their trolleys, proceed to the checkout, proffer their paycards and wait. The cost of the foods frequently exceeds the funds in the card. The customer removes this food, that food, the next – until the tally equals the funds. First to go are milk, vegies, fruit. Then meat. Finally the customer is left with white bread and brown fizzy cola.

The Doc reels at the choices, at the grip on appetite and taste of these poisons: “more harmful – because more widespread  – than alcohol”. The Doc, an old utopian, dreams of a switch to the Zero option, the sugarless drinks that will please the taste for sweet and the pull of caffeine…The Doc does not fear the scaremongering over artificial sweeteners; thirty years ago these were going to cause cancer. Thirty years on he is still waiting for those cancers. Meanwhile sugar’s harm is here, everywhere…

The experience of that old doc is my experience precisely. In fifty communities, over twenty five years, I have seen these carbs at work on babes in arms, on youths and matrons, on aunties and uncles. In go those carbs and the gap widens that we are successfully closing elsewhere.

2 thoughts on “How to Widen the Gap

    • Hello Anna

      Thank you – I think
      I regret I am Unfamiliar with Sarah Wilson and with Facebook
      Well that’s only partly true: the SW stuff is gospel , the Facebook stuff is wishful
      As for sugar, traditionally, Aboriginal people pampered a sweet tooth with sugar bag ants: it took a lot of any hunting to achieve caries or diabetes . Obesity was an in achievable ambition.
      Look at early photos and paintings of indigenes and we see lean figures. With our flour and our sugar and unhunted game (I mean spearable cows and sheep) we carried out a two century clinical trial of death by knife and fork. Aboriginal reality is rapidly overtaken by whitefellas. We have a black future. That’s one way to close the gap.

      Hg

      Like

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